Skip To ContentSkip To Content
    • The more your student participates in Live lessons, the more they will understand, and be able to complete their assignments in Seesaw. Teachers record their live lessons for students who are unable to make it to class. You can find a link to the chat for your student's daily meeting. The link will be at the end of the chat for that particular day.
    • If you have a plan with your teacher to do separate work from that which the teacher assigned (like an alternate math workbook), make sure you share that work with the teacher so that they can understand your student’s academic growth.
    • While we do not require students to turn on their camera during live meetings, we have learned that the time together is more engaging and enjoyable when we can see each other. If your student is distracted by their own image, they can use a post-it note on the screen to cover it up. Students can also blur their background to allow them in-home privacy.
    • Help foster your student’s independence by encouraging them to handle as much of the technical processes as they are capable of. Our experience is showing us that with only a few guided repetitions of a task (like logging into Seesaw through Clever), students can completely do it on their own most of the time. As we get further into the school year, there will be more technical tasks for students to accomplish (like switching from whole class to small group meetings), so building up their capacity now will save you work in the long run.
    • It can be frustrating when technology doesn’t work, for students and parents. This is a great opportunity to practice and model patience. Let the teacher know in the chat that there is a tech issue and then try 1) leaving and re-entering the meeting 2) Turning the device all the way off and re-starting after 1 minute. If this doesn’t solve the problem, don’t worry. Teachers record lessons so that students can access it later. Have your student work on assignments in Seesaw and try to access the class later.
    • It is alright to let your student give an incorrect answer. This is where the learning happens. Let your student answer questions in live and asynchronous lessons on their own, to the best of their ability. This way, teachers know what they haven’t taught your student yet. This is especially true if the assignment is an Exit Ticket, which is a tool that teachers use to quickly gauge a student’s understanding of the concept or process.
    • When your student is given an opportunity to disengage from their device (like lunch time, recess, bio breaks, math or literacy workbook time) encourage them to turn off their camera, mute their microphone and truly walk away from the screen. It is helpful for their mind and their bodies. Have them use a timer to remind them to go back on time. If you need help getting a timer for your student, contact the Cedar Park office.
    • Remind your student to use the restroom and get a water bottle or eat a snack during the scheduled breaks so that they don’t need to leave during live class time.
    • If possible, try to set up a specific learning space for your student that has space for their supplies and materials. The more consistently a student relates to their spot as a learning space, the more focused in their learning they will be in that spot.
    • Quiet fidgets are a great tool to have in a learning spot. A fidget is not a toy, it is something that can be manipulated in a simple manner and gives brains a chance to focus on a task by giving an energetic body a physical outlet. Some good fidgets are squeeze balls, snap bracelets, putty, a small stuffed animal, etc. If your student is interacting more with their fidget than the learning task, then it has become a toy and should be saved for free time.
    • Students love to interact with each other in the chat. In our current edition of Teams, there is no feature to turn off the chat and students have discovered that they are able to chat with each other outside of class meeting times, despite reminders from teachers that they should consider the chat closed when the meeting ends. As a parent, you should understand that this is unsupervised time. Teachers and staff review all chat before the start of the next school day, but they aren’t necessarily witnessing it live. We often re-teach and remind students about digital citizenship, and we hope you will reinforce those lessons in your own family.
    • Take a moment to celebrate a small achievement every day. Students are doing a very good job, but Distance Learning can be stressful, and students are feeling isolated from each other. Little acknowledgements that they solved a problem, achieved a goal, made someone smile, helped someone learn, etc. helps put some bloom into their day and increases their positive self-talk.
    • When teachers or support staff set up new meetings for small groups or enrichment classes, they will email an Outlook invitation to you student’s SPS email. This will automatically populate an appointment in their Outlook Calendar, whether they accept the invitation or not. Then, all they must do is go to their Outlook Calendar and click on the appointment and click on the link in the appointment to join the meeting. Take a moment with your student to explore their Outlook (Clever>Microsoft365>Outlook) email and calendar so it is always easy for them to access.
    • With Distance learning, parents have a unique opportunity to see inside the classroom in a manner that they wouldn’t otherwise. You will see that teaching methods and curricula look very different now than when you were a student in elementary school. Sometimes you might not understand why a teacher is teaching your student to do a math problem in a very specific way, when they could get the same answer in an easier way. Don’t worry about that, your student is being taught all the ways to get that answer because it will help them understand the concept of the math better. Understanding why and how is better than just knowing what. If you have questions about the learning targets for your student’s lesson, reach out to their teacher. They will be more than happy to walk you through it.